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THE FUTURE OF DATA ANALYTICS

This year’s Qlik Southern Africa Summit 2017, entitled “Does your world make sense?” the key message that reverberated across all presentations was for data analytics tools to be effective, they need to work at the speed of thought (and accurately so). In a world that changes with every passing second, waiting months, weeks, days, or even hours for a report simply isn’t good enough.

“Business intelligence is not an event,” confirms Jane Thomson, Managing Director at South Africa Qlik Master Reseller. “It’s not something one can work towards and tick off a list. It has no beginning and no end; it must constantly evolve and continue to provide valuable information as the company (and the world) changes from one minute to the next.”

Utilising data analytics to change the way we work and the world around us is possible; if the solution is fast, intelligent, accurate, reliable, interactive and offers only one version of the truth. “If all available, relevant data is brought together and analysed as a unit, there can be only one final answer. This eliminates ambiguity in terms of interpretation or manipulation, and helps companies to manage their futures more effectively,” adds Thomson.


Futurist, Graeme Codrington gave a view into the future and Qlik’s experts discussed how to make data driven possibilities possible, the African perspective on data analytics, and product insights. Partners from various industries shared their valuable case studies, and the directors of KPI Management Solutions shared their knowledge on determining how to maximise operations through people and processes.

One thing is certain data is the new oil. Especially in the field of data analytics, innovation and foresight are essential to success. Even more so, perhaps, is the ability to look beyond the traditional scope of analytics, with the understanding that knowledge is power and information can change the world. From SANParks thwarting the efforts of rhino poachers in the Kruger National Park, to catching a Polish serial killer and saving Randgold Resources R1 million a day – the possibilities truly are endless in a data driven world.